Children of the Magenta: The crash of American Airlines flight 965

This section of the center fuselage was the only recognizable part of the Boeing 757 after the crash. (National Geographic)
FARC rebels march in Colombia. (Reuters)
N651AA, the aircraft involved in the accident. (Werner Fischdick)
The Tower Air incident at JFK earlier that day. (Unknown photographer via Getty Images)
The route of American Airlines flight 965. (Google + own work)
The first of several misunderstandings. (Google + own work)
The new landing proposal: straight in from the north. (Google + own work)
Captain Tafuri’s odd request. (Google + own work)
By accidentally selecting ROMEO instead of ROZO, Captain Tafuri ordered the plane to fly 132 miles back to the northeast. (Flight Safety Foundation)
The aircraft makes its first of two fatal turns. (Google + own work)
And the plane makes its second fatal turn. (Google + own work)
The controller knows something is wrong, on a purely mathematical basis, but is unable to articulate his concern. (Google + own work)
CGI artist’s impression of the final moments of American Airlines flight 965 as it tries desperately to avoid the mountain. (Captain Airplane on YouTube)
The center section was all that remained of the fuselage; the survivors were all seated here. (National Geographic)
Officials and relatives await news of the missing plane. (Pedro Ugarte via Getty Images)
An aerial view of the crash site revealed flattened trees and widely scattered debris. (El Pais)
Rescuers fill body bags with the remains of the victims. (Meredith Davenport via Getty Images)
This stitched photo of the crash site was put together by Colombian investigators. (Aeronautica Civil de Colombia)
Rescue workers pull more bodies from the wreckage. (Meredith Davenport via Getty Images)
Looking at the state of the wreckage, it is quite difficult to understand how anyone survived. (Meredith Davenport via Getty Images)
Much of the wreckage was nearly unrecognizable. (El Pais)
This appears to be part of the aft galley. (El Pais)
Another angle on the center fuselage section. (National Geographic)
The front page of the New York Times two days after the accident. Because the crash happened late at night, the papers the following morning had not caught up on the story. (New York Times)
Much of the debris was hopelessly entangled with ruined vegetation. (El Pais)
The tail of the 757 was near the bottom of the debris field. (El Pais)
N566AA, the aircraft involved in the flight 1572 accident, seen here 14 years later. (Chris Vervais.)
A recovery worker squeezes between mangled debris and broken trees. (El Pais)
An EGPWS moving map display. (Ready for Takeoff Podcast)
A helicopter brings wreckage to a collection area below the crash site. (El Pais)

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Analyzer of plane crashes and author of upcoming book (eventually™). Contact me via @Admiral_Cloudberg on Reddit or by email at kylanddempsey@gmail.com.

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Admiral Cloudberg

Admiral Cloudberg

8.9K Followers

Analyzer of plane crashes and author of upcoming book (eventually™). Contact me via @Admiral_Cloudberg on Reddit or by email at kylanddempsey@gmail.com.